First Half of 2019 – PDC in Review

Earth Repair Corps Teaches 2nd PDC at Texastopia Farm in Blanco, Texas
January through June, 2019
Written by: Kirby Fry
All Images © Woody Welch 2019

This past winter and spring of 2019 Earth Repair Corps had the privilege and honor to teach its second permaculture design course at Texastopia near the headwaters of the Blanco River.  The design course consists of 72 hours of classroom instruction, group activities after lunch, individual and group design projects which are presented to the class, and a talent show on the last evening of class.

View overlooking the main house and classroom facility of Texastopia Farm.

Class Overview

The classroom provided to Earth Repair Corps by Texastopia offers a great learning environment for both teachers and students.  There’s comfortable seating and tables, a 4’ tall by 16’ wide dry erase board, a “close throw” projector with a pull down movie screen, surround sound, dimmable lights, and a fabulous air conditioning system.  ERC couldn’t ask for more.

The course curricula covers the first 9 chapters of Bill Mollison’s book, Permaculture: A Designer’s Manual, and then goes over specific design systems for the home moving outward from there to the areas closest to the house and then out into the broader landscape.  

One distinction of this spring PDC is that we have been making an effort to emphasize the difference between design methodologies and design systems, and so along with methods of permaculture design, Earth Repair Corps has also been teaching Yeomans’ Scale of Permanence 1 and Savory’s Holistic Decision Making Process 2 .

This spring, thanks to the speaking and recruitment efforts of Pete VanDyck, we had 3 members of the Edwards Aquifer Authority (EAA) attend the PDC.  Carol Patterson, Mark Hamilton, and Thomas Marsalia all attended representing EAA’s board, upper management, and field technicians. EAA has tens of thousands of acres on the Edwards Plateau in conservation easements that it oversees and is looking to implement soil and water conservation methods that were discussed during class on a model site.  Their design project was phenomenal.

Along with many other great students were two of ERC’s partners, Randie Piscitello with Goodwater Montessori Public Charter School, and Jennifer Goode with Texastopia and ERC attended the course and earned their PDC certification.

Class Curriculum & Activities 

Our guest teachers included Shelley Belinko who taught about design principles and methods of design, Heather King who taught about annual vegetable gardening, Travis Krause who taught about running a family farm and animal systems, and Peggy Sechrist who taught about Holistic Management and intensive cell grazing.

One of the activities that the class participated in was using the radial laser level to layout two conservation terraces and a level sill spillway above Texastopia’s road leading to the Blanco River.  Then, by the time the class resumed the following month, Pete VanDyck and Texastopia had installed the terraces, planted them with native trees, and mulched them with straw. It was a great design process for the class to be a part of.

About a quarter of the way through the course, day 3 or so, the students begin their design projects.  This spring PDC we allowed a wide range of projects including group and individual projects, as well as onsite and offsite projects.  This gives students the opportunity to work on designs for their own properties, and or work together as a team on site if they do not have land of their own.  I was especially impressed with the design project that the EAA team presented for a piece of land that may soon become a lab and working model for soil and water conservation methods on the Edwards Plateau.  All students are encouraged to make use of Yeoman’s Scale of Permanence and Google Earth Pro for their presentations.

Students trace a sitemap of Texastopia before conducting an energy flow activity.
Students present their energy flow maps.

The evening before the last day of class we held a talent show.  Bill Mollison always had a talent show during his PDC’s and joked that if you don’t perform in the talent show you wouldn’t graduate.  What I usually experience is students being surprised and a little uncomfortable before the talent show, but really opening up and having a fantastic time during the talent show.  Not only did we have several musical performances, but people sharing with us what they are good at, and giving us “how to” demonstrations.

The spring 2019 PDC covered a wide range of topics and hopefully opened doors for its graduates to further pursue those topics.  One of the main objectives of the course is that the graduates become better designers and hopefully better teachers of sustainable design.  Those of us teaching the class get to make new friends, and support others in their efforts to create abundance through good design.

If you’re interested in learning more about our Permaculture Design Certification and obtaining one yourself, please read more here.

References:

  1. Using the Scale of Permanence as a Tool for Land Evaluation
  2. An Overview of Holistic Management and Holistic Decision Making

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